Thursday, July 21, 2005

And the Bride Wore White


bride
Originally uploaded by Bloomington Girl.
Bloomington, IN. July 16, 2005

In a small ceremony at the home of her parents, Megan Wesley McGary, 20, of Kokomo, Indiana married Abram Rayl, 25, also of Kokomo. The short but sweet ceremony was performed by the Rev. Will Mills, a kindly minister of unknown denomination who clearly declared his transportation preference by riding up to the McGary homestead on a Harly Davidson Hog. The Rev. Wills sported a leather vest for the occasion. Neighbors looked on with curiousity.

The bride looked radiant in a white empire-waisted wedding gown with spaghetti straps. The gown was expertly tailored to accomodate the generous bun in the bride's oven. The groom looked very handsome in a black tuxedo. The bride was attended by her sister, Katelyn, 21 of St. Louis, MO who wore a lovely lilac dress and who didn't seem to mind that her younger sister had beaten her to the altar. The groom was attended by his smiling brother, Joseph Rayl, who wore a black tuxedo.

While usually an Indiana tradition at this type of marriage, there were no shotguns visible at the McGary-Rayl union. What may account for this anomoly is that the Bride's family hails from the more civilized East Coast, where such things are frowned upon.

The bridal party waited upstairs while guests listened to classical music and sipped champagne, which, was thoughtfully provided by the step-mother of the bride. At the anointed time, the guests took their seats in the McGary living room which was lavishly decorated with an abundance of seasonal blooms purchased at the Bloomington Farmer's market that very morning.

The groom and best man waited with the grey-goteeed Rev. Mills at the "altar" as the wedding party proceeded down the grand staircase in the McGary foyer. Escorting Katelyn down the stairs was her younger brother Jackson, age 4 3/4, who looked quite handsome and grown-up in his blue blazer and tie. To the relief of his parents, Jackson was able to pull himself together after a tantrum-style meltdown precipitated by his having not gotten something or other that he wanted. The bride was then walked down the staircase by her handsome father, Chris, whose brave smile hid any grief he might have had about giving his younger daugther away.

The ceremony began. The bride and groom looked lovingly into each other's eyes as they began their vows. The best man looked on calmly and happily. In contrast, the maid of honor had a stricken look on her face and began gesturing to her aunt, conveniently seated in the back, that she had forgotten to bring the rings with her to the "altar". When the aunt could not find the rings, Katelyn became a bit more agitated. Instead of this detracting from the tender ceremony, it added a memorable degree of levity that all present, especially the bride, are sure to not quickly forget.

When the moment for the ring exchange arrived, Katelyn kicked off her high heels and ran upstairs and fetched the bands of gold. The ceremony then proceeded without further incident, although the bride's face momentarily showed her dispeasure with her forgetful sister.

The groom kissed the bride and the 24 guests applauded. More champagne was enjoyed while formal pictures were taken. Sadly, the younger brother of the bride was unable to be in any photographs because he was upstairs screaming his head off, adding an interesting backround "music" to the after-ceremony festivities.

The party then proceeded to Restaurant Tallent, the finest restaurant in Bloomington, for a small, but elegant dinner reception. The step-mother of the bride had tirelessly and self-lessly planned all aspects of the ceremony and reception, right down to the beautiful hand-made Martha Stewart-Inspired favors and place cards. When complimented on the lovely reception, the modest lady declined to take credit, saying with a laugh, "Oh, it was nothing! I am simply the checkbook! " (I don't know about you but this Bloomington reporter looks forward to attending many more social events planned by the remarkable Mrs. McGary. Mrs. McGary, by the way, looked elegant in a two-piece twenties style dark plum dress.)

The bridal cake was made by the mother of the groom. It was a three-tiered heart shaped cake and was beautiful and delicious. In addition to an expertly prepared dinner and fine wines, guests were treated to two take-home party favors. One was a hand decorated box full of the bride's favorite candies and the second was a CD prepared by the groom with four of the bride and groom's favorite love songs. Unfortunately, one of the songs had lyrics that were somewhat sexually explicit and the step-mother of the bride wishes very much that she had screened the CD instead of just trusting her otherwise wonderful son-in-law.

After a very brief honeymoon in Indianapolis, the bride and groom will reside in a small but charming home they have purchased in Kokomo, Inidana. They are expecting their first child, a girl, in early September.

The parents of the bride declined an in depth interview for this article, but Mrs. McGary had this statement:

"Megan's pregnancy is the crowning touch for me as I endeavor to be a real Hoosier. To be a grandmother at 43 is entirely natural here in Indiana. This new role will require me to make some personal changes, however. I am working hard to gain at least 40 pounds and lose a few teeth. Then, I will start smoking and purchase some sweatshirts with catchy slogans such as "Delicate...Handle with Prayer" to complete the image. It isn't what I had planned, but as usual, I will throw myself into my new role with my typical enthusiasm."

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